Photosynthetic light-harvesting systems

organization and function : proceedings of an international workshop, October 12-16, 1987, Freising, Fed. Rep. of Germany

Publisher: W. de Gruyter in Berlin, New York

Written in English
Published: Pages: 631 Downloads: 971
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Subjects:

  • Photosynthetic bacteria -- Congresses.,
  • Bacteria, Photosynthetic -- Congresses.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographies and indexes.

Statementeditors, Hugo Scheer, Siegfried Schneider.
ContributionsScheer, Hugo, 1942-, Schneider, Siegfried, 1940-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQR88.5 .P483 1988
The Physical Object
Paginationxv, 631 p. :
Number of Pages631
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2031489M
ISBN 100899254276
LC Control Number88007083

  The photosystem II (PSII) light-harvesting system carries out two essential functions, the efficient collection of light energy for photosynthesis, and the regulated dissipation of excitation energy in excess of that which can be used. In nature, NPQ is heterogeneous in terms of kinetics and capacity, and this adapts photosynthetic systems Cited by: chromophores in the photosynthetic membrane and opens a door to the study of excitation transfer in the PSU based on a priori principles.. LH-II. The structure of LH-II from Rs. molischianum had been determined to Å resolution and is shown in Fig. 3a. The complex is an octameric aggregate of αβ-heterodimers; the latter contains a pair of short peptides (α- and β . Similarly the light harvesting systems associated with the photosystems of different types of photosynthetic organisms have common principles for capturing solar energy across the whole of the visible spectrum and facilitating efficient energy transfer to the associated reaction centres with minimum losses of by: Light harvesting, excitation energy/electron transfer, and photoregulation in artificial photosynthetic systems. In Multiporphyrin Arrays: Fundamentals and Applications (pp. ). Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. by: 1.

understanding of light-harvesting systems has been made in recent years, with the determination of several antenna protein structures and the matur-ing of ultrafast spectroscopic and molecular bio-logical techniques for investigation and manipulation of photosynthetic systems. This is amply reflected in the special issue, which is organized Author: Robert E. Blankenship. This book provides a comprehensive treatment of all aspects of photosynthetic light-harvesting antennas, from the biophysical mechanisms of light absorption and energy transfer to the structure, biosynthesis and regulation of antenna systems in whole organisms. Disorder in Photosynthetic Light Harvesting Complexes: A Three-Pulse Photon Echo Peak Shift Study of the B Band of the LH2 Complex, R. Agarwal, M. Yang and G. R. Fleming, In Ultrafast Phenomena XII (Springer), (). Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) is a mechanism employed by plants and algae to protect themselves from the adverse effects of high light intensity. It involves the quenching of singlet excited state chlorophylls (Chl) via enhanced internal conversion to the ground state (non-radiative decay), thus harmlessly dissipating excess excitation energy as heat through .

In this paper, we explore quantum entanglement among the pigments in light-harvesting complex II (LHCII). LHCII is the most abundant photosynthetic antenna complex in plants containing over 50% of the world’s chlorophyll molecules [18]. As depicted in figure 1, the complex is a trimeric system composed of three monomeric subunits arranged Cited by: @article{osti_, title = {Self-Assembly Strategies for Integrating Light Harvesting and Charge Separation in Artificial Photosynthetic Systems}, author = {Wasielewski, Michael R.}, abstractNote = {In natural photosynthesis, organisms optimize solar energy conversion through organized assemblies of photofunctional chromophores and catalysts within proteins that . Structural Features of Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems H. Zuber I. Introduction 43 II. Antenna System of purple bacteria 46 III. Antenna System of green photosynthetic bacteria 57 IV. Antenna Systems of cyanobacteria and red algae 60 V. Antenna Systems of algae and higher plants 68 VI. Concluding remarks 76 References

Photosynthetic light-harvesting systems Download PDF EPUB FB2

Light-Harvesting Antennas in Photosynthesis is concerned with the most important process on earth - the harvesting of light energy by photosynthetic organisms.

This book provides a comprehensive treatment of all aspects of photosynthetic light-harvesting antennas, from the biophysical mechanisms of light absorption and energy transfer to the structure, biosynthesis.

Photosynthetic Membranes and Light-Harvesting Systems (this volume). As we approached the organization of the current volume, we chose a set of topics for coverage that would complement the earlier volumes, as well as provide updates of areas that have seen major advances in recent years.

In addition, we wanted to emphasize the following Format: Paperback. Systems Biophysics: Global and Target Analysis of Light Harvesting and Photochemical Quenching in vivo.

Ivo H.M. van Stokkum. Part 5: Artificial and Natural Photosynthesis. Light Harvesting, Photoregulation. and Photoprotection in Selected Artificial Photosynthetic Systems.

Photosynthetic Membranes and Light-Harvesting Systems (this volume). As we approached the organization of the current volume, we chose a set of topics for coverage that would complement the earlier volumes, as well as provide updates of areas that. Buy The Photosynthetic Membrane: Molecular Mechanisms and Biophysics of Light Harvesting on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders3/5(1).

Browse book content. About the book. Search in this book. Search in this book. Browse content Structural Features of Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems. Each volume of the Photosynthetic Reaction Center contains original research, methods, and reviews.

Together, these volumes cover our current understanding of how photosynthesis. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: 1 online resource (XX, pages) Contents: I. Introduction to Light-Harvesting Photosynthetic Membranes and Their Light-Harvesting Antennas The Pigments Optical Spectroscopy in Photosynthetic Antennas The Evolution of Light-harvesting Antennas --II.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

The major light-harvesting complex shown in figure 1a is LHCII. It is seen as trimers of individual LHCII proteins. Each LHCII binds 15 chlorophylls and a typical absorption spectrum is shown in figure phyll a absorbs, on average, at nm and chlorophyll b at nm. Biophysicists work out the pathways and timescales of energy transfer among these by: Photosynthesis is a highly regulated, multistep process and depends on light-harvesting complexes that comprise photosynthetic pigments.

It encompasses the harvest of solar energy, transfer of excitation energy, energy conversion, and electron transfer Photosynthetic light-harvesting systems book water to NADP +, ATP generation, and a series of enzymatic reactions that assimilate. @article{osti_, title = {PS Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems}, author = {Niederman, Robert A.

and Blankenship, Robert E. and Frank, Harry A.}, abstractNote = {These funds were used for partial support of the PS Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems, that was held on August,at Washington.

Buy Photosynthesis III: Photosynthetic Membranes and Light Harvesting Systems Paperback / softback by ISBN: Free postage on orders over £50 to UK and Ireland. No visitors allowed on the premises. Over billions of years, evolutionary pressure has facilitated the development of sophisticated and diverse light-harvesting systems in photosynthetic organisms, enabling them.

Beekman LMP, Steffen M, van Stokkum I, Olsen JD, Hunter CN, Boxer SG and van Grondelle R (b) Characterization of the light-harvesting antennas of photosynthetic purple bacteria by Stark spectroscopy. LH1 antenna complex and the B subunit from Rhodospirillum rubrum.

J Phys Chem B – CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: Systems Biophysics: Global and Target Analysis of Light Harvesting and Photochemical Quenching in vivo Ivo H.M.

van Stokkum. Part 5: Artificial and Natural Photosynthesis. Light Harvesting, Photoregulation. and Photoprotection in Selected Artificial Photosynthetic Systems.

We present temperature-dependent fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime measurements on the LH-1 and LH-2 complexes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and on the isolated B subunit of Rhodospirillum rubrum. From these measurements the superradiance is calculated, which is related to the delocalization of excitations in these complexes.

In the B preparation we find Cited by: Request PDF | Evolution of photosynthetic light harvesting antenna systems and energy transfer efficiency | In this review, we attempt to reveal the role of physical rules played in the evolution.

A light-harvesting complex has a complex of subunit proteins that may be part of a larger supercomplex of a photosystem, the functional unit in is used by plants and photosynthetic bacteria to collect more of the incoming light than would be captured by the photosynthetic reaction center alone.

Light-harvesting complexes are found in a wide variety. It addresses the underlying physics of light harvesting and key spectroscopic methods, including data analysis. It discusses assembly of the natural system, its energy transfer properties, and regulatory mechanisms.

It also addresses light-harvesting in artificial systems and the impact of photosynthesis on our environment. The largest phylum of bacteria is called Proteobacteria, or purple bacteria, all of which are thought to have stemmed from an ancestral photosynthetic species.

Purple photosynthetic bacteria have two light-harvesting systems, LH1 and LH2, both of which are circular complexes of proteins and pigment molecules.

Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems Organization and Function Proceedings of an International Workshop OctoberFreising, Fed Rep. of Germany Editors Hugo Scheer • Siegfried Schneider W G DE Walter de Gruyter • Berlin • New York   In this way, the long-lived vibrational coherences observed in photosynthetic light-harvesting systems can dramatically affect the efficiency by which reaction centers trap the excitations of the surrounding chlorophylls.

The challenge is to discover these vibrational modes and how nature has managed to select them and suppress by:   Coherent phenomena in photosynthetic light harvesting: part two—observations in biological systems Harry W.

Rathbone, 1 Jeffery A. Davis, 2 Katharine A. Michie, 1 Sophia C. Goodchild, 3 Neil O. Robertson, 1 and Paul M. Curmi 1Cited by: 3. Google Workshop on Quantum Biology Quantum Mechanics of Photosynthetic Light Harvesting Machinery Presented by Mohan Sarovar Octo ABSTRACT After a brief discussion about the conditions.

While the organization of light harvesting antenna complexes relative to the photosynthetic membrane have very different structure.

Examples shown are representative of: a, Higher plants and green algae. b, Cyanobacteria and red algae. c, Author: Gema Lorena López Lizárraga, Juan Cristóbal García Cañedo.

/ Light harvesting, excitation energy/electron transfer, and photoregulation in artificial photosynthetic systems. Multiporphyrin Arrays: Fundamentals and Applications. Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd., pp. Photosynthetic algae have been refining their technique for capturing light for millions of years.

As a result, these algae boast powerful light harvesting systems — proteins that absorb light to be turned into energy — that scientists have long aspired to understand and mimic for renewable energy applications. Great progress in the study of structure and dynamics of photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment−protein complexes has recently resulted in detailed understanding of the light-harvesting and light-conversion processes of photosynthesis.

We review and discuss recent results on the elementary excitation transfer dynamics of the purple bacterial LH2 peripheral by:   A large part of the book demonstrates the excitonic effects in a multitude of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes and how we can understand these properties on the basis of the exciton concept.

Contents: Introduction: Structural Organization, Spectral Properties and Excitation Energy Transfer in Photosynthesis; The Exciton Concept. In the remainder of this section the structural features and light harvesting characteristics of exemplary photosynthetic systems from cyanobacteria, plants, and purple bacteria are compared (Fig.

In particular, the supramolecular architecture of purple bacterial light harvesting systems are inspected, selected here and in the authors Cited by:. chosen books like this photosynthesis iii photosynthetic membranes and light harvesting systems encyclopedia of plant physiology, but end up in harmful downloads.

Rather than reading a good book with a cup of coffee in the afternoon, instead they juggled with some infectious bugs inside their desktop computer. Light energy captured by the light-harvesting systems of PSII (LHCII) and PSI (LHCI) is transferred to the reaction center chlorophylls to create a charge separation across the membrane.

This leads to the formation of a strong oxidant on the donor side of PSII capable of splitting water into molecular oxygen, protons, and by: Light Harvesting in Photosynthesis book. Edited By Roberta Croce, Rienk van Grondelle, Herbert van Amerongen, Ivo van Stokkum.

Light harvesting, photoregulation, and photoprotection in selected artificial photosynthetic systems Author: Roberta Croce, Rienk van Grondelle, Herbert van Amerongen, Ivo van Stokkum.